(Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke

characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke

free read Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth 106 Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth A man who strove to be a just worthy Indian kingIn this bold and captivating biography Audrey Truschke enters the public debate with a fresh look at the controversial Mughal emperor Sheer propaganda bookIn her book writer claimed Aurangzeb wasn t an Islamist fanatic To support her claims she cited his Farman recording his donation to Mahant of Chitrakoot Balaji temple This farman was proven a forgery long ago Instead i suggest you to read Aurangzeb by Jadunath Sarkar and Shahenshah by NS Inamdar

summary Aurangzeb The Man and the MythAurangzeb The Man and the Myth

free read Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth 106 Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth Aurangzeb Alamgir r 1658–1707 the sixth Mughal emperor is widely reviled in India today Hindu hater murderer and religious zealot are just a handful of the modern caricatures of t In this book Audrey Truschke takes up the challenge of addressing one of the most controversial figures of Indian history The book should be read in the spirit it was written as a preliminary engagementexploration of alternative understandings about Aurangzeb A historian s task to this extent is doubly challenging identifying the source material and putting aside one s predispositions and prejudices in the task of interpreting the sources Truschke claims she has stepped forward from earlier research read Jadunath Sarkar s on Aurangzeb in this regardThe author attempts to understand Aurangzeb s core values and how they informed his rule as an emperor She claims that Aurangzeb wanted to be a just king a good Muslim and a sustainer of Mughal culture She condones Aurangzeb s use of violent tactics to continue his plans of an expansionist state In her words But the uestion before us is not whether Aurangzeb was a just king Rather I want to know what Aurangzeb thought it meant to be a just Mughal king and how that shaped is world views and actions as emperor of Hindustan P13However at a few points in the book it is hard to reconcile the author s benign reading of Aurangzeb with her own evidence The narrative construct seems repetitive and thin The reader is left unconvinced For instance the author claims Aurangzeb extended state security to Hindu and Jain temples often than he demolished them Aurangzeb authorized targeted temple destructions and desecrations throughout his rule PP 100 101 Though Aurangzeb issued an order in 1672 recalling all endowed land grants given to Hindus and reserved all such land grants for Muslims it was not strictly enforced hence a second order was issued Truschke contends that If strictly enforced this move would have been a significant blow to Hindu and Jain religious communities but historical evidence suggests otherwise P105 I feel the author widely misses the point that policy stance sets the tone for public culture Policy initiatives especially in those times cannot be taken lightly The empire existed to please the emperor In the absence of appropriate checks and balances in that time and day the emperor s inclinations would have directed and shaped political culture of the publicThe idea that Aurangzeb s religious ideas were puritanical and that he was pious than his predecessors is contested in the book I wish the author would have delved deeper into the tenuous relation between religion and politics That the Mughal emperors and even the kings of the Delhi Sultanate in the earlier centuries strived to win over the religious leaders to legitimize their authority has been explored elsewhere It is this nuance that might have been explored in the book For all his piety and stance on morality I feel Aurangzeb was not far from his predecessors in craving approval from the Ulema and privileging the role of religion in real politick Rulers of the Delhi Sultanate and early Mughal emperors were aware that they might have won over the land but the popular will and sympathies lied with the Sufi masters who were the real Kings ruling the hearts of the people I would have liked to read about Aurangzeb s contentious relation with the Sufis of Delhi and the Deccan The author does have a good point that Aurangzeb s piety might have been a performance for himself to redeem himself from guilt for his past actions and for others to gain credibility The conflicting personalities of Aurangzeb are laid out in Chapters 4 and 5 I wish the author would have engaged on Aurangzeb s lack of an enduring legacy Had he consolidated his victories and built a bureaucratic apparatus to implement his idea of justice history would have remembered him as fair and impartial and not as a vindictive impulsive emperor meting out retributive justiceWe need scholars like Truschke to challenge received understanding but we also need rigorous scholarship that moves beyond conjecture and thin evidence Loretta Rose up the challenge of addressing one of the most controversial figures of Indian history The book should be read in the spirit it was written as a preliminary engagementexploration of alternative A Season of Ten Thousand Noses understandings about Aurangzeb A historian s task to this extent is doubly challenging identifying the source material and putting aside one s predispositions and prejudices in the task of interpreting the sources Truschke claims she has stepped forward from earlier research read Jadunath Sarkar s on Aurangzeb in this regardThe author attempts to Silent Thunder understand Aurangzeb s core values and how they informed his rule as an emperor She claims that Aurangzeb wanted to be a just king a good Muslim and a sustainer of Mughal culture She condones Aurangzeb s Si Dindo Pundido use of violent tactics to continue his plans of an expansionist state In her words But the Si Dindo Pundido uestion before Wizards Tale III us is not whether Aurangzeb was a just king Rather I want to know what Aurangzeb thought it meant to be a just Mughal king and how that shaped is world views and actions as emperor of Hindustan P13However at a few points in the book it is hard to reconcile the author s benign reading of Aurangzeb with her own evidence The narrative construct seems repetitive and thin The reader is left Wizards Tale III unconvinced For instance the author claims Aurangzeb extended state security to Hindu and Jain temples often than he demolished them Aurangzeb authorized targeted temple destructions and desecrations throughout his rule PP 100 101 Though Aurangzeb issued an order in 1672 recalling all endowed land grants given to Hindus and reserved all such land grants for Muslims it was not strictly enforced hence a second order was issued Truschke contends that If strictly enforced this move would have been a significant blow to Hindu and Jain religious communities but historical evidence suggests otherwise P105 I feel the author widely misses the point that policy stance sets the tone for public culture Policy initiatives especially in those times cannot be taken lightly The empire existed to please the emperor In the absence of appropriate checks and balances in that time and day the emperor s inclinations would have directed and shaped political culture of the publicThe idea that Aurangzeb s religious ideas were puritanical and that he was pious than his predecessors is contested in the book I wish the author would have delved deeper into the tenuous relation between religion and politics That the Mughal emperors and even the kings of the Delhi Sultanate in the earlier centuries strived to win over the religious leaders to legitimize their authority has been explored elsewhere It is this nuance that might have been explored in the book For all his piety and stance on morality I feel Aurangzeb was not far from his predecessors in craving approval from the Ulema and privileging the role of religion in real politick Rulers of the Delhi Sultanate and early Mughal emperors were aware that they might have won over the land but the popular will and sympathies lied with the Sufi masters who were the real Kings ruling the hearts of the people I would have liked to read about Aurangzeb s contentious relation with the Sufis of Delhi and the Deccan The author does have a good point that Aurangzeb s piety might have been a performance for himself to redeem himself from guilt for his past actions and for others to gain credibility The conflicting personalities of Aurangzeb are laid out in Chapters 4 and 5 I wish the author would have engaged on Aurangzeb s lack of an enduring legacy Had he consolidated his victories and built a bureaucratic apparatus to implement his idea of justice history would have remembered him as fair and impartial and not as a vindictive impulsive emperor meting out retributive justiceWe need scholars like Truschke to challenge received The Friend understanding but we also need rigorous scholarship that moves beyond conjecture and thin evidence

characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke

free read Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth 106 Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth His maligned ruler While many continue to accept the storyline peddled by colonial era thinkers that Aurangzeb a Muslim was a Hindu loathing bigot there is an untold side to him as Old wine in an old bottle that is the impression one feels after reading this small book on the last great Mughal emperor Aurangzeb Alamgir He was a controversial figure then as now All of India with the exception of a bunch of Left leaning career historians consider Aurangzeb as a tyrant who harassed and intimidated the non Muslim non Sunni subjects in untold number of ways This dislike comes out in ways than one Aurangzeb ki Aulad progeny of Aurangzeb is an invective in India which one hurls against his opponent in the heat of the argument The administration of Delhi changed the name of Aurangzeb Road in the city to APJ Abdul Kalam Road in 2015 Just because the emperor treated his non Muslim non Sunni subjects so badly his name is revered in Pakistan and other places where jihadists exert their vicious influence The Mughals ruled over a vast empire whose population outstripped the entirety of Europe in 1600 Supplicants from European courts literally begged for trading concessions from the Mughals Aurangzeb was well known in the higher echelons of England at that time as evidenced in the heroic tragedy Aureng zebe penned by the poet laureate John Dryden in 1675 This book is by a young author who seeks to clear the myths about the legendary king and bring out the truth Wholesale whitewashing of Aurangzeb off all his heinous crimes is the outcome of this volume Audrey Truschke is assistant professor of South Asian history at Rutgers University in Newark New Jersey Her teaching and research interests focus on the cultural imperial and intellectual history of early modern and modern India c1500 present Unfortunately the primary source research of the book relies solely on printed editions and no new facts are mentioned anywhereAurangzeb was the most pious Mughal king But piety was never translated into righteousness in this cruel prince s career The mistreatment of his own father Shah Jehan is a case in point Ya takht ya tabut either the throne or the grave was the prevailing maxim among brothers in the imperial household The successful brother not necessarily the eldest usually killed or blinded his siblings in the struggle for succession But extending this rationale for lusting after power to one s own father was a trifle too much even for medieval sensibilities The Sharif of Mecca declined to recognize Aurangzeb as the proper ruler of Hindustan and refused his financial gifts for several years until Shah Jehan was dead in his son s captivity Contrary to Islamic doctrine Aurangzeb was a staunch believer in astrology and continued to consult astrologers till the end of his life Like other princes of the era he too was fond of shapely dancers and singers Trushcke remarks about his whirlwind romance with a courtesan named Hirabai Zainabadi in Burhanpur that created ripples of palace gossip He was enthusiastic in erecting fine mausoleums for his loved ones just like other Mughal kings Aurangzeb s first wife Dilras Banu Begum died from complications following the birth of her fifth child and the king erected a fine tomb Bibi ka Mabara at Aurangabad Locals still call it Poor man s Taj Aurangzeb s transition to Puritanism after 1669 is clearly noted in the book As part of his Deccan campaign the capital was shifted to the South and the king and his entourage lived in tents thereafter for the rest of his life His nomad ancestors had lived in tents and in a twist of fate the world seizer alamgir also spent his life in tents in the wilderness He tried to ensure justice to the people but corruption was widespread under the elusive uest for justice Even Abdul Wahhab the chief azi judge and hence a moral guide to the empire freely indulged in backhand dealings Truschke makes a vain attempt to praise Aurangzeb for increasing the share of Hindu nobility from 225 per cent under Akbar to 316 per cent of the total The real cause for this increase was the frantic attempt to incorporate the Maratha aristocracy into the Mughal nobility so as to co opt them in the fight against the Deccan sultanates Aurangzeb s cruelty to Sambhaji who was Shivaji s son and captured by Mughal troops is mentioned in the book He was forced to wear funny hats and was led into court on camels He then had Sambhaji s eyes stabbed out with nails and later had him decapitated His body was chopped to pieces and thrown to the dogs while his head was stuffed with straw and displayed in cities throughout the Deccan p69 Aurangzeb at his typical bestThe author justifies all the wicked acts of Aurangzeb in a rather unabashed way She somewhat assumes a So What attitude to the emperor s most heinous depredations He banned public festivities in the kingdom Truschke justifies it on concerns with public safety He resorted to forcible conversion of Hindus The author does not deny it but counters it with the laughable claim that some individuals found compelling reasons to adopt Islam so as to climb Mughal hierarchy and conversions made people eligible for jobs reserved for Muslims Thus she indirectly admits that there was indeed discrimination of the worst kind Aurangzeb executed several prominent members of the Shiite Mahdavi sect No problem the Mahdavis had political ambitions He destroyed temples No problem they acted against imperial interests He demolished Vishwanath temple at Benares in 1669 and Keshav Dev temple at Mathura in 1670 No problem this was just to punish political missteps by the temple associates Aurangzeb desecrated Ahmedabad s Chintamani Parshwanath Jain temple No problem the evidence is fragmentary incomplete or contradictory Aurangzeb recalled all endowed lands given to Hindus and reserved all future land grants to Muslims only No problem this was possibly just a concession to the ulema Muslim clergy So goes the author s justifications Trushcke s arguments can be summarized thus Aurangzeb could have destroyed all the temples in India He didn t and hence you must be grateful to his generosity This is as ridiculous as positing that since Hitler could have killed all the Jews in Germany but didn t is a valid reason the Jews must regard him as a level headed great rulerThe book devotes only a short space to Aurangzeb s role in the scrapping of the Mughal kingdom which labored on for only 150 years after his death It is wrong to ascribe all blame on a single person but it is undeniable that the seeds of destruction was planted well within the lifetime of the last great Mughal Truschke doesn t mention anything about the slide towards disaster Persians and Afghans robbed the country at their sweet will Warlords roamed the kingdom and often kept the royal family in hostage Mughal princesses were forced to dance without veil in front of their lustful eyes and lewd gestures Emperor Shah Alam II s eyes were gouged out of its sockets by the bare hands of such a warlord in a fit of rage The penultimate Mughal king Akbar Shah II r1806 37 charged foreign visitors for an audience with him to make both ends meet The last one Bahadur Shah II sided against the British and ended up transported for life in Burma while his lineage was brutally cut short by the arms of the British army Thus ended the Mughal dynasty in 1857The book is a total disappointment because of the single point agenda of the author in justifying Aurangzeb by whatever means It includes a few colour paintings on the life of the emperor The book includes a good indexThe book is recommended


10 thoughts on “(Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke

  1. says: (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke

    summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters Aurangzeb has been cast as an unmitigated villain by the British a myth which has been enthusiastically adopted

  2. says: (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke

    characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth Short reviewOne word to describe this book SHAMEFULGenocide denial is a crime in several parts of the world But in India especially in regards to Hindu history glorifying fanatic and rabid mass murderers not only does not land you in jail but instead makes you an 'intellectual' and an 'accomplished writer' Having the pri

  3. says: Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth

    Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke In this book Audrey Truschke takes up the challenge of addressing one of the most controversial figures of Indian history The book should be read in the spirit it was written as a preliminary engagementexploration of alternative un

  4. says: characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke

    (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke If you care about serious objective history this book is pure rubbish The sort of cherry picking of facts that this book employs is adeuate to convince the lay reader that Aurangzeb was one of the most pious rulers to hav

  5. says: (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke

    (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters A revisionist history of Aurangzeb that tries to portray him in a different light but fails

  6. says: (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke

    (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth Old wine in an old bottle – that is the impression one feels after reading this small book on the last great Mu

  7. says: summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters

    characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters Sheer propaganda bookIn her book writer claimed Aurangzeb wasn't an Islamist fanatic To support her claims she cited his Farman recording his donation to Mahant of Chitrakoot Balaji temple This farman was proven a forgery long ago Instead i suggest you to read Aurangzeb by Jadunath Sarkar and Shahenshah by NS I

  8. says: Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke

    (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth Aurangzeb Alamgir a pivotal figure in the Indian medieval past is often shrouded in the mystery of a man or a myth two visions of him feature in public discourse of India and Pakistan Aurangzeb the Bigot and Aurangzeb the Pious This book is not a biography per se but an attempt to discard the popular image of him which exists in this age; i

  9. says: (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke

    summary Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke I want back the time and money I spent on reading this rubbish This author is obsessed with Aurangzeb one of the most vile mass murderers of Indian history Its sad to see her trying to push her agenda as Indian history Authors who h

  10. says: characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke Audrey Truschke ☆ 6 characters (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke

    (Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth) PDF READ ☆ Audrey Truschke characters ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ☆ Audrey Truschke Someone Else’s Sins Will Not Justify Your SinsThe author desperately tried to defend Aurangzeb by just saying those where common practice at that time given the opportunity Dara Shukoh would did the same Most idiotic thi

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  • Hardcover
  • 189
  • Aurangzeb The Man and the Myth
  • Audrey Truschke
  • English
  • 18 June 2020
  • 9780670089819

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