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  • George MacDonald Fraser
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  • 20 May 2019
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FREE DOWNLOAD uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II DOWNLOAD è uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II Nd to modern eyes possibly eccentric Cumbrian borderers with whom the author then nineteen served in the last great land campaign of World War II when the 17th Black Cat Division captur. I m reading George MacDonald Fraser s 1925 2008 Flashman series with a curious mixture of pleasure and distaste the pleasure arising from the excellent adventures of the ne er do well Flashman the wonderfully reconstructed historical settings and the satire of as I see it British upper classes patriotism and hero worship of military heroes not of military heroism itself mind the distaste sweeping out of the many signs of racism and acts of rape and violence towards women Of course the latter are to be expected in a novel set in the early 19th century but in the first volume of the Flashman series the protagonist is the primary implementer of said outrages To deal with my ambivalence I had to learn about the author so when I found that he had written a memoir of the Burmese corner of World War II which had been called one of the great memoirs of the Second World War by John Keegan a well known military historian I obtained a copy and dived right in uartered Safe Out Here 1992 is that memoir As a fresh 19 year old recruit MacDonald Fraser is inserted into a veteran unit engaged in pushing the Japanese out of Burma in 1945 VE Day is close but the Japanese are unimpressed and are still a powerful force in Burma though increasingly poorly supplied By that time the American submarine fleet had swept the sea of Japanese cargo ships and they and the air fleet kept the Japanese warships in harbor The last suicide mission of the Japanese navy was yet to comeI ve read at least a dozen WW II memoirs written by ordinary soldiers American British German and Japanese and I have found them all gripping really But this book and William Manchester s memoirs has the advantage of being written by an experienced author and it showsMacDonald Fraser s evocation of the soldiers landscape and atmosphere of that campaign is wonderful as is his presentation of a novice soldier s experience of firefights the compression and extension of time like an accordion the random choice of friends who fall the absence of conscious thought as training and instinct take over The real adventures and humor are plentiful even in the attack on Pyawbwe which broke the back of the Japanese 33rd Army MacDonald Fraser managed to get dropped down a wellMacDonald Fraser s unit was composed primarily of men from Cumberland and he lets them speak in Cumbrian in the book It sounds a bit like Scots to me which is reasonable enough since the dialects are spoken in contiguous regions Some hilarious passages in the book are carried out entirely in that dialect An example the division had worked out a complicated password scheme which was beyond the mental capacity of a few of the soldiers One of those few was trying to get back into the lines and screwed up the password The entire exchange was carried out in Cumbrian what are the chances that the Japanese even knew about the dialect much less could reproduce it and the men knew exactly with whom they were speaking but the farce had to be played out to the end increasingly salted with colorful invective I was propped up in bed with tears rolling down my faceHere s a taste of the Cumbrian when they were slogging through the Burmese dry belt Wahm Ah s aboot boogered By hell Ah could do wi some fookin joongle Ah tell tha Maybe I m alone here but I think this is priceless MacDonald Fraser still hated the Japanese in 1992 uoting approbatively an officer who called them a shower of sub human apes And I couldn t say that his view of other races indeed anyone except Brits Americans and Gurkhas is any advanced than that of Flashman In at least this respect Flashman is made in the image of his creatorReturning to my original ambivalence what is evident from this memoir and other sources on the web eghttpwwwtelegraphcoukcomment35httpwwwindependentcouknewsobi is that MacDonald Fraser was a strange mixture of rigid conservative and rambunctious rebel who retreated to a tax haven the Isle of Man and inveighed against the poofs and pinkos running the country The only analogy for the man I can draw from my own life are the folks Americans call rednecks socially and politically arch conservative basically contemptuous and distrustful of anybody who is not a good old boy racism is a natural corollary but nonetheless ready to shoot any revenooer who stumbles across their still marijuana field or crystal meth lab and to complain bitterly about the federal government s intrusion into their rights Strangely enough their beat up pickup trucks are usually plastered with patriotic bumper stickers But still I don t understand what MacDonald Fraser s intent is by making the protagonist of the Flashman series a complete coward who always comes up roses for he deeply admires and knows from personal experience those who bravely do their duty in warfare Those latter types are usually killed off in the Flashman series to assure that there are no living witnesses of Flashman s cowardice So the mystery is deepened At least Flashman commits no further rapes after the first volume since in MacDonald Fraser s words he no longer needed to I ll then continue freely to interpret Flashman s abysmal behavior as it pleases me a satire even if the satire is not of the kind MacDonald Fraser would approve Rating Stir It Up great land campaign of World War II when the 17th Black Cat Division captur. I m reading George MacDonald Fraser s 1925 2008 Flashman series with a curious mixture of pleasure and distaste the pleasure arising from the excellent adventures of the ne er do well Flashman the wonderfully reconstructed historical settings and the satire of as I see it British upper classes patriotism and hero worship of military heroes not of military heroism itself mind the distaste sweeping out of the many signs of racism and acts of rape and violence towards women Of course the latter are to be expected in a novel set in the early 19th century but in the first volume of the Flashman series the protagonist is the primary implementer of said outrages To deal with my ambivalence I had to learn about the author so when I found that he had written a memoir of the Burmese corner of World War II which had been called one of the The Cambridge Handbook of Social Problems great memoirs of the Second World War by John Keegan a well known military historian I obtained a copy and dived right in uartered Safe Out Here 1992 is that memoir As a fresh 19 year old recruit MacDonald Fraser is inserted into a veteran unit engaged in pushing the Japanese out of Burma in 1945 VE Day is close but the Japanese are unimpressed and are still a powerful force in Burma though increasingly poorly supplied By that time the American submarine fleet had swept the sea of Japanese cargo ships and they and the air fleet kept the Japanese warships in harbor The last suicide mission of the Japanese navy was yet to comeI ve read at least a dozen WW II memoirs written by ordinary soldiers American British German and Japanese and I have found them all Handbook of Psychophysiology gripping really But this book and William Manchester s memoirs has the advantage of being written by an experienced author and it showsMacDonald Fraser s evocation of the soldiers landscape and atmosphere of that campaign is wonderful as is his presentation of a novice soldier s experience of firefights the compression and extension of time like an accordion the random choice of friends who fall the absence of conscious thought as training and instinct take over The real adventures and humor are plentiful even in the attack on Pyawbwe which broke the back of the Japanese 33rd Army MacDonald Fraser managed to Frugal Innovation get dropped down a wellMacDonald Fraser s unit was composed primarily of men from Cumberland and he lets them speak in Cumbrian in the book It sounds a bit like Scots to me which is reasonable enough since the dialects are spoken in contiguous regions Some hilarious passages in the book are carried out entirely in that dialect An example the division had worked out a complicated password scheme which was beyond the mental capacity of a few of the soldiers One of those few was trying to American Presidents Deportations and Human Rights Violations get back into the lines and screwed up the password The entire exchange was carried out in Cumbrian what are the chances that the Japanese even knew about the dialect much less could reproduce it and the men knew exactly with whom they were speaking but the farce had to be played out to the end increasingly salted with colorful invective I was propped up in bed with tears rolling down my faceHere s a taste of the Cumbrian when they were slogging through the Burmese dry belt Wahm Ah s aboot boogered By hell Ah could do wi some fookin joongle Ah tell tha Maybe I m alone here but I think this is priceless MacDonald Fraser still hated the Japanese in 1992 uoting approbatively an officer who called them a shower of sub human apes And I couldn t say that his view of other races indeed anyone except Brits Americans and Gurkhas is any advanced than that of Flashman In at least this respect Flashman is made in the image of his creatorReturning to my original ambivalence what is evident from this memoir and other sources on the web eghttpwwwtelegraphcoukcomment35httpwwwindependentcouknewsobi is that MacDonald Fraser was a strange mixture of rigid conservative and rambunctious rebel who retreated to a tax haven the Isle of Man and inveighed against the poofs and pinkos running the country The only analogy for the man I can draw from my own life are the folks Americans call rednecks socially and politically arch conservative basically contemptuous and distrustful of anybody who is not a Rediscovering Our Galaxy Iau S334 good old boy racism is a natural corollary but nonetheless ready to shoot any revenooer who stumbles across their still marijuana field or crystal meth lab and to complain bitterly about the federal When Movements Become Parties government s intrusion into their rights Strangely enough their beat up pickup trucks are usually plastered with patriotic bumper stickers But still I don t understand what MacDonald Fraser s intent is by making the protagonist of the Flashman series a complete coward who always comes up roses for he deeply admires and knows from personal experience those who bravely do their duty in warfare Those latter types are usually killed off in the Flashman series to assure that there are no living witnesses of Flashman s cowardice So the mystery is deepened At least Flashman commits no further rapes after the first volume since in MacDonald Fraser s words he no longer needed to I ll then continue freely to interpret Flashman s abysmal behavior as it pleases me a satire even if the satire is not of the kind MacDonald Fraser would approve Rating

FREE DOWNLOAD uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II

uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II

FREE DOWNLOAD uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II DOWNLOAD è uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II Ed a vital strongpoint deep in Japanese territory held it against counter attack and spearheaded the final assault in which the Japanese armies were to uote General Slim “torn apart?. These days if I watch historical drama on TV I m often left with the feeling that the programme makers have imposed modern social attitudes on the period featured Maybe it was ever thus and it s a theme that features uite prominently in George MacDonald Fraser s memoir written in the late 80s In his introduction the author comments that later generations have a tendency to envisage themselves in the 1940s and imagine their own reactions and make the fatal mistake of thinking that the outlook was the same then They cannot see that they have been conditioned by the past forty years into a new philosophic condition they fail to realise there is a veil between them and the 1940s The reader certainly gets a feeling of authenticity from this memoir Although the author considered himself a Scotsman he grew up in the town of Carlisle about 12 miles south of the Scottish border where his father had a doctor s practice As a result he joined the Border Regiment which recruited from that part of England In both nationality and class he was something of an outsider although it seemed that it was the class differences that stood out On one occasion a newcomer to his section complained about stomach pains the night before an attack He ll have to go sick I said Aye said Forster Sick wid nerves I said it might be appendicitisand Forster spat and said Ah doot it Peel said nothing and we moved off to the Assembly point The author continued by observing of his comrades in arms They belonged to a culture in which windy is the ultimate insult and in which the synonym for brave is mad and that is all there is to be said about it As the above exchange illustrates much of the book s dialogue is rendered in North of England dialect easy enough for a British reader to follow maybe harder for others The descriptions of actual fighting are both vivid and visceral and the author is not one to express any feelings of regret or guilt On the contrary he exults in killing Japanese soldiers whom he regarded as murderers and as rapists of civilian women He retained these feelings for the rest of his life He concedes in the book that he found it difficult to reconcile the Japanese soldier of the forties with the young men he encountered at airports in subseuent decades but added that old habits died hard and he preferred not to sit next to them In general it s probably fair to say that MacDonald Fraser s social and political attitudes got stuck sometime around 1947 For all that this is an exceptionally powerful read especially for anyone interested in WWII The book ends with a wonderful epilogue where MacDonald Fraser attends a remembrance service on the 50th anniversary of VJ Day Swimming to the Moon generations have a tendency to envisage themselves in the 1940s and imagine their own reactions and make the fatal mistake of thinking that the outlook was the same then They cannot see that they have been conditioned by the past forty years into a new philosophic condition they fail to realise there is a veil between them and the 1940s The reader certainly Stir It Up gets a feeling of authenticity from this memoir Although the author considered himself a Scotsman he The Cambridge Handbook of Social Problems grew up in the town of Carlisle about 12 miles south of the Scottish border where his father had a doctor s practice As a result he joined the Border Regiment which recruited from that part of England In both nationality and class he was something of an outsider although it seemed that it was the class differences that stood out On one occasion a newcomer to his section complained about stomach pains the night before an attack He ll have to Handbook of Psychophysiology go sick I said Aye said Forster Sick wid nerves I said it might be appendicitisand Forster spat and said Ah doot it Peel said nothing and we moved off to the Assembly point The author continued by observing of his comrades in arms They belonged to a culture in which windy is the ultimate insult and in which the synonym for brave is mad and that is all there is to be said about it As the above exchange illustrates much of the book s dialogue is rendered in North of England dialect easy enough for a British reader to follow maybe harder for others The descriptions of actual fighting are both vivid and visceral and the author is not one to express any feelings of regret or Frugal Innovation guilt On the contrary he exults in killing Japanese soldiers whom he regarded as murderers and as rapists of civilian women He retained these feelings for the rest of his life He concedes in the book that he found it difficult to reconcile the Japanese soldier of the forties with the young men he encountered at airports in subseuent decades but added that old habits died hard and he preferred not to sit next to them In American Presidents Deportations and Human Rights Violations general it s probably fair to say that MacDonald Fraser s social and political attitudes Rediscovering Our Galaxy Iau S334 got stuck sometime around 1947 For all that this is an exceptionally powerful read especially for anyone interested in WWII The book ends with a wonderful epilogue where MacDonald Fraser attends a remembrance service on the 50th anniversary of VJ Day

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FREE DOWNLOAD uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II DOWNLOAD è uartered Safe Out There A Harrowing Tale of World War II ‘There is no doubt that uartered Safe Out Here is one of the great personal memoirs of the Second World War’ John KeeganLife and death in Nine Section a small group of hard bitten a. There are a few personal accounts of war and its impact on a man that stand out in the sea of such literature works such as Goodbye to All That Homage to Catalonia and The Men I Killed uartered Safe Out Here has now joined that short list MacDonald Fraser is the acclaimed author of the Flashman series of historical fiction but here he reveals his own experience as an infantryman in merciless combat against the Japanese in Burma Here is an all too vivid recollection of the fear pain discomfort and yes the pleasure of comradeship among the common soldiers who win or lose ALL wars MacDonald Fraser reminds us that wars are not just politics by other means wars are about young men their lives their deaths and their friendships As one reviewer said MacDonald Fraser has raised a memorial with this book Deep Souths Delta Piedmont and Sea Island Society in the Age of Segregation great personal memoirs of the Second World War’ John KeeganLife and death in Nine Section a small Religion and Violence Philosophical Perspectives from Kant to Derrida group of hard bitten a. There are a few personal accounts of war and its impact on a man that stand out in the sea of such literature works such as Goodbye to All That Homage to Catalonia and The Men I Killed uartered Safe Out Here has now joined that short list MacDonald Fraser is the acclaimed author of the Flashman series of historical fiction but here he reveals his own experience as an infantryman in merciless combat against the Japanese in Burma Here is an all too vivid recollection of the fear pain discomfort and yes the pleasure of comradeship among the common soldiers who win or lose ALL wars MacDonald Fraser reminds us that wars are not just politics by other means wars are about young men their lives their deaths and their friendships As one reviewer said MacDonald Fraser has raised a memorial with this book