A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF)


10 thoughts on “A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF)

  1. says: A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF)

    read A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review a remarkably detailed horrible to read documentary account of the murder of the Jews of Bedzin clearly posing the choices faced by the Jews and the heartless murder committed by the Germans Nazis and civilians alike no German could have failed to know what was going on the August 1942 deportation relied on trickery and deception to get Jews to collect themselves in a place that could easily be overseen and guarded the roundup was initiall

  2. says: A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) read A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust

    Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) Disclaimer Received an ARC via NetgalleyThe uestion of how people could just stand by and let something happen is always ta

  3. says: A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review

    read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) This was a inc

  4. says: read A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF)

    A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) After World War II most German families had to come to terms with the role of their members in the Third Reich For the sons and daughters of the Nazi bigwigs this obviously was a painful process Some have written movingly about it Less known are the stories of the unexceptional middle ranking bureaucrats who did not plan the Holocaust but helped to facilitate it perhaps unaware of the full magnitude of the cr

  5. says: A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook

    read A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) Back when I was a naïve bright eyed college student thinking of becoming a school teacher and minoring in German I briefly flirted with the idea of incorporating my love of history and my German degree by trying to solve the unsolvable while obtaining my PhD What was that unsolvable uestion Why did an entire p

  6. says: read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review read A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust

    A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) A Small Town Near AuschwitzBy Mary FulbrookHistorian Mary Fulbrook tells the story of Udo Klausa a civilian administrator in the small town of BedzinThis is a non fiction account of events that took place during

  7. says: read A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF)

    A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) This very powerful book accomplishes a shift in the historiography of ht Holocaust While most writing about the fate of the Jews has focused on the death camps Fulbrook looks at events in one town in the two years before the 85000 Jews were ta

  8. says: A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review

    read A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) The research for this book is outstanding as is the concept What did non Jews know and how did they let this happen Using a family connection in a small village the author sets out to discover how half a town could go missing and people still say they didn't know what was happening I did find this book a bit hard to read

  9. says: A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook

    A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) While definitely a very informative read the dry dull tone of the narration paired with the jagged insertion of the personal accounts leaves something to be desired for a fluid narrative It's still very informative but it cannot seem to strike a balance between the human and historical elements it wishes to tell

  10. says: A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF)

    read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust (PDF) This was dense and scholarly than I was looking for at the time

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read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook

A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust

Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust characters ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Timonies interviews and other sources Mary Fulbrook pieces together his role in the unfolding stigmatization and degradation of the Jews under his authoritiy as well as the heroic attempts at resistance on the part of some of his victims She also gives us a fascinating insight into the inner conflicts of a Nazi functionary who throughout considered himself a 'decent' man And she explores the conflicting memories and evasions of his life after the warBut the book is much than a portrayal of an individual man Udo Klausa's case is so important because it is in many ways so typical Behind Klausa's story is the larger story of how countless local functionaries across the Third Reich facilitated the murderous plans of a relatively small numbe After World War II most German families had to come to terms with the role of their members in the Third Reich For the sons and daughters of the Nazi bigwigs this obviously was a painful process Some have written movingly about it Less known are the stories of the unexceptional middle ranking bureaucrats who did not plan the Holocaust but helped to facilitate it perhaps unaware of the full magnitude of the crimes they were party toOne such middle manager was Udo Klausa 1910 98 a Catholic bureaucrat who served as Landrat town administrator in Bedzin a Polish town near Auschwitz which was annexed by Germany after the invasion of 1939Mary Fulbrook s A Small Town Near Auschwitz tells the story of this man one who perceived himself as a decent person The twist is that the author is friendly with the Klausa family Udo s wife Alexandra was Fulbrook s godmotherThis proximity has given Fulbrook a historian access to letters and other private documents which usually are not available to the ordinary historian This indisputable advantage also creates an ethical dilemma the author might be tempted to diminish the responsibility of a man she knew and liked Fulbrook discloses and discusses these ethical conflictsIn the event Fulbrook pulls no punches She interrogates Klausa s war time record fairly but robustly and demolishes many of his post war justifications which were recorded in a self serving memoir The picture of Klausa that emerges can be applied to many other Germans and it helps us acuire a sense of how the nation of Goethe Bach and Gutenberg could have fallen for the thuggery of the Nazi PartyFulbrook explains this by reference to seduction and threat In the early years of their reign the Nazis increased employment returned order to the chaos of the Weimar Republic brought a sense of economic justice and restored an affirming national consciousness The price for this collective buoyancy was the demise of democracy and the persecution of Jews and political opponents The long suffering German people put up with that as an expedientBroad acuiescence in the regime was further assured through the uncompromising intimidation by a mighty state that was prepared to exercise fear and reward loyaltyA Small Town Near Auschwitz makes the obvious but often forgotten point that not all Nazis were the same or even motivated by a common vision There were the fanatical true believers fellow travellers swept along by a movement and those who tried to make the best out of a bad situation As a practising Catholic Udo Klausa had many points of philosophical divergence with Nazism but he found ways to separate his faith from his ambitions of rising up the bureaucratic ranksHe saw himself not as a convinced Nazi even though he was a member of the Nazi s paramilitary SA even before 1933 but as having innocently become guilty this is the author s translation I would use the word culpable through his role in BedzinFulbrook doesn t buy Klausa s pleas of ignorance he must have known much of what was happening his repeated and ultimately successful attempts to extricate himself from his position in Bedzin by serving as a soldier on the Russian front hint at an unease at what he was being part ofKlausa s tenure as Landrat helps to explain how it was possible to carry out the pogroms and random massacres the systematic dispossession of Jews the herding into ghettos the forced labour the summary executions the deliberate starvation and ultimately the industrial extermination though nothing can possibly explain the arbitrary gleeful inhumanity shown by many Germans in its executionFulbrook sums it up well Not everybody was a perpetrator in the obvious sense of committing direct acts of physical violence or directly giving orders that unleashed such violence Yet the Holocaust was possible only because so many people acted in ways that over a long period of time created the preconditions for the ultimate acts of violence Klausa Fulbrook writes lacked the capacity to register the human conseuences of policies carried out in service of a deeply racist state This is hardly a defence of the man but an indictment The philosopher Hannah Arendt s famous uote about the banality of evil seems to apply to the likes of Klausa even than it does to its original target the war criminal Adolf EichmannFulbrook complements her research into Klausa by interviews with Jewish survivors of Bedzin and towns like it including Arno Lustiger a cousin of the late Cardinal Jean Marie Lustiger who spoke to nobody about his experiences for 40 years She also refers to war time letters and documents from Bedzin s Jews thereby giving a voice to the victims of Udo Klausa s actionsSome historians argue that attempting to understand the Shoah is not only impossible but also dangerous saying it should remain incomprehensible Fulbrook s book shows that it is possible to glean some understanding of the Shoah without stripping it of its inexplicability Review in The Southern Cross

read A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust

Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust characters ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB R among the Nazi elite and of how those plans could never have been realized on the same scale without the diligent cooperation of these generally very ordinary administrators As Fulbrook shows men like Klausa 'knew' and yet mostly suppressed this knowledge performing their day jobs without apparent recognition of their own role in the system or any sense of personal wrongdoing or remorse either before or after 1945This account is no ordinary historical reconstruction For Fulbrook did not discover Udo Klausa amongst the archives She has known the Klausa family all her life She had no inkling of her subject's true role in the Third Reich until a few years ago a discovery that led directly to this inescapably personal professional history This very powerful book accomplishes a shift in the historiography of ht Holocaust While most writing about the fate of the Jews has focused on the death camps Fulbrook looks at events in one town in the two years before the 85000 Jews were taken to Auschwitz to be murdered A historian of Germany Fulbrook s godmother was the wife of an administrator of a region of Poland during those years Using her godmother s letters the administrator s memoirs interviews with survivors and archival material she constructs a dual story from the point of view of the survivors and from the point of view of the administrator Aside from the administrator s absurd denials of responsibility for the fate of the Jews which the author demonstrates many times what is most compelling is the extent of the degradation and humiliation that the Jews suffered in the years before the extermination Fulbrook argues that this dimension of the story has been neglected Certainly I had only a superficial appreciation of this In terms of deepening my understanding of events in Eastern Europe during World War II this book is a worthy seuel to Bloodlands

read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook

Mary Fulbrook Å 7 review read Ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Å Mary Fulbrook A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust characters ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB The Silesian town of Bedzin lies a mere twenty five miles from Auschwitz; through the linked ghettos of Bedzin and its neighbouring town some 85000 Jews passed on their way to slave labour or the gas chambersThe principal civilian administrator of Bedzin Udo Klausa was a happily married family man He was also responsible for implementing Nazi policies towards the Jews in his area inhumane processes that were the precursors of genocide Yet he later claimed like so many other Germans after the war that he had 'known nothing about it'; and that he had personally tried to save a Jew before he himself managed to leave for military service A Small Town Near Auschwitz re creates Udo Klausa's story Using a wealth of personal letters memoirs tes This was a incredibly interesting book about a small Polish town named Bedzin that was located only 25 miles away from Auschwitz Now 25 miles sounds like a far enough distance that the people who lived in there might be able to say that they had no idea what was going on in Auschwitz and that is exactly what they claimed after the war ended In particular the focus of this book is on the Landrat or county administrator Udo Klausa who claimed he was innocent of any wrongdoing as far as the Holocaust was concerned but who was only doing his job Klausa wasn t a fanatical Nazi but was loyal to the party and in doing his job helped to facilitate the deaths of so many thousands of Jews who passed through Bedzin on their way to AuschwitzThis is a difficult book to read It shows how low level officials who claim they were only doing their job actually were receiving ill gotten benefits for the work they performed This is an exceptionally well done book the while text is accessible to anyone interested in reading about the Holocaust the research is impeccable and resources reliableThis book was an EARC received from NetGalley

  • Hardcover
  • 464
  • A Small Town Near Auschwitz Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust
  • Mary Fulbrook
  • English
  • 05 October 2019
  • 9780199603305

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